All posts by Pieter

Coming Home to Port

Happy Easter! I’ve just completed my first 5k of many more to come over the next 50 days. After a rather late night it was quite refreshing to get out in the spring sun even though the temperature still isn’t exactly warm. Yesterday involved a lot of fruit wine tasting at the Cairn O’Mohr winery in Perthshire. Quite a baffling range of different fruits, leaves and flowers get turned into the varying concoctions and the place just oozes quirkiness and fun. Ron, the founder and owner took us round and showed us where he grows the elderflowers and berries. He’s full of great stories and I will do a more detailed blog on this soon.

If you ever find yourself in Perthshire, between Perth and Dundee, go and see them.

We then popped into Gleneagles where I used to work back in the days, longer ago than I care to admit! A very juicy ribeye was washed down with a taster of Primitivo and a delicious Cannonau from Sardinia before heading home to some cheese and Port. And it’s that Port I’m choosing as my wine for today. The Fonseca ‘Terra Prima’ is an utterly delicious reserve Port made using organic grapes. The fruit is juicy, concentrated and jammy. And at around £16 a bottle it is amazing value too. You’ll probably need to head to your independent specialist for this one. If you’re in Glasgow go to the Good Spirits Co in Bath Street.

Keep on Running

At the risk of everyone starting to call me Forrest, I’ve yet again signed up for the 5×50 Challenge. I love running and love this challenge because it encourages everyone to get off the sofa, join and resolve to run, walk, jog, cycle 5 kilometres per day for 50 days. I did it back in the autumn last year and can’t wait to get started on the next instalment on Easter Sunday.

Trusty trainers ready for another challenge.
Trainers might need a polish.

On the face of it, it doesn’t sound like that much but when you’re doing this every day it makes a huge difference, but it’s also a tough challenge. I had quite a few days on the previous one where my body just didn’t want to go anymore but, mind over matter, you get out and get going and come back feeling better for it.

One of my other challenges is sharing some of the wonderful wines I taste on a weekly basis online, on this blog. Sometimes I just lack the motivation to write or say something meaningful, so in tandem with the running challenge I’m going to review 50 wines over the course of the 50 days right here. Hopefully they are going to span the weird and wonderful, the great and, perhaps, the not so great.

Wine Trade folks, if you want to help and you want me to review your wine, please get in touch! But at the very least, if you’re reading this, why not sign up for the challenge yourself? It may just change your life!

And please, drink responsibly!

 

Update 28 March:

I’ve decided the wine review challenge will now also have to cover 50 grape varieties. That should make for a very varied bunch.

 

Corked Wine and Cling Film

Opening a bottle of wine and finding it is corked is hugely frustrating. The smell of damp cardboard, or as they like to say in Scotland, that ‘fusty’ smell is horrible and ruins the wine. I know a lot of effort has gone in trying to eradicate this problem, but I still come across it far too often.

Over the past few months a number of different people mentioned on Twitter that you can ‘save’ a bottle of wine by decanting it and stuffing cling film into the decanter. The cling film somehow is supposed to absorb the cork taint and leave the wine clean as a whistle. When I came across a corked bottle the other day I was about to angrily pour the foul-smelling contents down the drain, but just then it came to me that cling film could be my saviour.

Want to know what happened?

Wines of Rhone Valley – Paul Jaboulet

There are some names in the world of wine that everyone seems to know. I’m never quite sure if that is because they are very well-known or because I experienced the wines very early on in my career. Paul Jaboulet is one such name. I remember studying the wines of the northern Rhone valley at the Hotelschool and some of the Jaboulet wines ended up being tasted as benchmark wines of the style. I don’t think we had ‘La Chapelle’, more likely a Crozes-Hermitage. La Chapelle has always been expensive, one of those top of the range, luxury wines, coming from the best sites on the hill of Hermitage. That’s no different today. In fact, each bottle comes with a special card containing a code which allows access to a VIP part of the website to enhance the exclusive experience. I bet they didn’t have that back in 1834 when Antoine Jaboulet established the first vineyards on the slopes of the Hermitage.

These days Paul Jaboulet Aîné, to give it its full name, is owned by the Frey family, who also make wine in Bordeaux and Champagne. Caroline Frey took over as winemaker in 2006 and she produces a wide range of wines, from both the Southern and Northern Rhone. Wines like the popular Parallèle 45 provide an introduction to Cotes du Rhone with a traditional blend of Grenache and Syrah for example. But the domaine’s history lies further north and with the Syrah variety in particular. And it was those wines we concentrated on during a tasting of the wines with Marie Cordonnier, Paul Jaboulet’s export director. I had a quick chat with her on video and asked her to pick one wine we could discuss. It may seem obvious to go for the luxury end and pick ‘La Chapelle’ but I wanted something a bit more down to earth. Marie picked the Domaine de Thalabert Crozes-Hermitage 2007. The reason is quite simple, it’s a very tasty wine, silky smooth, ripe fruit and a bit of an earthy edge. But these are also the first vineyards the Jaboulet family ever owned, so in effect this is where it all started.

We managed to taste a few others as well though. I can’t say I have much experience of the white wines from the Northern Rhone. Typical grape varieties are Marsanne and Roussanne for the Hermitage and Crozes-Hermitage and Viognier for the Condrieu. For some reason I expected these wines to be bigger, but a couple of times I wrote down ‘delicate’. I liked the ‘delicate’, slightly floral Marsanne/Roussanne blend ‘Mule Blanche’ from Crozes-Hermitage. Mule Blanche means white ass (as in donkey!). It is another of the older vineyards so named because in the early days the hardy donkeys were regularly used as pack animals in the vineyards.

The other wine that really floated my boat was the Cornas Grandes Terrasses 2009. A lovely warm, spicy nose, tasting of sweet black fruit and cocoa powder. As I’m a cheapskate I would chose this wine or the Domaine de Thalabert over the Hermitage La Chapelle. At around about the thirty pound mark for these wines I could get almost six bottles for one of La Chapelle. Only thing is, I really wanted to see what’s going on in the VIP section of the website. I wonder if there is a dress code?

 

The Scottish Connection

Food, Fun & Fizz – Burns in Love!

Wedged firmly between Burns Night and Valentines, the twain did meet in a very special Scottish food & wine tasting in Glasgow on February 6th. In conjunction with Brenda Anderson from Tasting Scotland we showcased Scotland’s infinite variety of produce while matching this with some superb wines from around the world that can trace their proudly Scottish roots.

When I started researching this tasting I was amazed by the sheer amount of wine I could chose from. The Scots really do get out there, making wine from Spain, to New Zealand, from Australia to South Africa and even a little in Scotland itself.

Kicking off the love was a Scottish Sparkling Strawberry wine from the quirky Cairn O’Mohr winery, made using local Perthshire strawberries. The medium-sweet fruity character makes it very easy drinking, which means you can have it on its own or pair it with lighter, fruit-based desserts.

The seven-stage menu provided plenty of opportunity to sample Scotland’s produce.

 

Some hae (smoked) meat

A taste of Smoked Beef & Smoked Venison from the Rannoch Smokery

These cold smoked meats call for quite a powerful wine and I chose the white Huia Gewürztraminer, from New Zealand’s Marlborough region, (£14) with its pungent nose and spicy character. It is rich and creamy enough to stand up to the food. The owners of the winery, Claire and Mike Allan make some very characterful wines and can trace their roots back to Scotland.

The La Multa Old Vine Garnacha (£8) is made by Scotsman Norrel Robertson MW. He is known as ‘El Escoces Volante’ or the Flying Scotsman. After starting his career with Oddbins he travelled the world, making wine in a variety of countries. He is now based in the Spanish Calatayud region where he makes a number of different wines, among which is this juicy, and far too easy drinking Garnacha.

 

The Rigs O’ Barley

Pearl Barley risotto served with Smoked Chicken & Smoked Duck from the Rannoch Smokery

The creaminess of the risotto and the different meats gave me an opportunity to experiment with two Australian wines. The Skillogalee Rose from Australia’s Clare Valley (£13) is a juicy blend of Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon. It really shows off the ripe fruit. The winery is owned by David and Diana Palmer who both originally came from Edinburgh and are now producing stunning wines in South Australia. Look out for their amazing wines from the Riesling grape as well.

The second wine is produced by the third Baron of Glenguin, Robin Tedder MW. This means he has a direct connection with the Glengoyne distillery just outside Glasgow. Robin Tedder’s grandfather was the first baron of the land the Glengoyne distillery occupies and was an excise man. I’m told he had a hand in bringing about the law that Scottish Whisky should be aged in oak for three years and one day. Glenguin Old Broke Semillon (£15) from Australia’s Hunter Valley. The tasters loved this wine with the smoked duck in particular. Despite its age (it was 2005) the wine was still full of zippy lemon and lime flavours, the acidity providing a good balance to the duck. Also keep a look out for a Glengoyne malt whisky finished in Robin’s Shiraz barrels.

 

Bard’s Broth

A modern take on the traditional ‘Scotch Broth’

Urlar Sauvignon Blanc (£12). Urlar is New Zealand winery and is the Gaelic word for earth. The winery was established in 2004 by Angus and Davina Thomson after they left their farm in the Scottish Highlands. Organic viticulture and sustainability are their driving forces and they even have a herd of Highland cattle on the estate, providing that magic Scottish ingredient by way of organic fertiliser. Their Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc is pretty textbook. Fresh, a mix of gooseberry and tropical fruits and characteristically mouthwatering.

 

The Great Chieftain o’ the puddin’ race

Haggis from Ramsay of Carluke

Iona the Gunnar (£14) is made by Andrew Gunn, who traces his family roots back to Scotland and even has Viking roots. Not only is the name Iona very Scottish, it is situated in Elgin. The vineyards were planted in an old apple orchard and the Sauvignon Blanc is outstanding, but I’m a big fan of ‘The Gunnar’ a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and a little Petit Verdot, like you get from Bordeaux. The proximity to the ocean lengthens the ripening season and it shows in the gorgeous ripe fruit.

 

The Poet’s Ploughman

Barwheys Cheese from Ayrshire

For the cheese I chose a classic southern French blend of Syrah, Grenache and Carignan. The Cotes du Roussillon Special Reserve Charles Rennie Mackintosh (£11.50) is an homage to Charles Rennie Mackintosh, who spent the last few years of his life in Port Vendres in the Western Languedoc, the heartland for these vines. Many of his paintings depict Port Vendres, a small port near the Spanish border, and the nearby landscapes.

 

Cupid’s Dessert Cocktail

An adult and liquid version of Cranachan. Shaken not stirred by our good friend Richard Duffy

 

Luscious Lots of Chocolate Love

White, Rose & Vanilla, Milk, Dark and The Chieftain by the Chocolate Tree, Edinburgh & East Lothian

With the dark and Haggis flavoured ‘The Chieftain’ we had a taste of El Puño (£18), one of my favourite Garnachas made by El Escoces Volante, Norrel Robertson who also produces the La Multa. This is full bodied, full of flavour with a chocolatey feel on the finish. Although I would have this with big, meaty dishes normally (think Sunday roast) but the ripe blackberry and plum fruit and chocolate make it work with the dark, bitter chocolates.

 

The various wines were supplied by:

www.rose-wine.com

Bibendum Wine

Cross Stobs Wine

Great Western Wine

 

 

Address to a Haggis

It’s that time again, when anyone with even the merest link to Scotland celebrates Burns’ Night with the traditional Haggis, Neeps and Tatties, piped in with great ceremony by kilt-clad Scotsmen and addressed with a recital of Robert Burns’ famous poem, ‘To a Haggis’. As any self-respecting Haggis fan knows, this rarely seen, four-legged animal comes in two varieties. One has a longer set of right legs, the other a longer set of left legs. This allows them to run around the mountains of the Scottish Highlands without tumbling down the slopes, but clearly only in one direction, depending on which set of legs is longer.

When it comes to the question of what to drink when this ‘beastie’ finally makes it to the dining table the traditionalists opt for Whisky and it would clearly have to be a Scottish one at that. But I’ve been having a go at wine with haggis and there is plenty there that can work well. Youthful whites provide a refreshing balance to what is an earthy dish. I’ve had Australian Pinot Noir Rosé where gorgeous ripe red fruit characters and a little toastiness work beautifully with the richness of the dish. This makes me think that a Champagne could work well here too. Or is that just too decadent? Spanish and Italian reds made from Garnacha or Sangiovese seem to be some of the most popular matches. The earthiness combined with plenty of fruitiness in the wine means they combine well with the meatiness of the dish, but the slightly higher levels of acidity and juicy, ripe fruit give it plenty of freshness to add a lighter touch to it all.

I suppose what it comes down to is personal taste. Doesn’t it always? But it also shows that this ‘great chieftain o’ the puddin’-race!’ is actually very versatile and easy to match with your favourite wine or whisky. If you feel like a little experimentation yourself then the Food, Fun & Fizz evening – ‘Burns in Love’ is a great opportunity. We’ll be doing some food & wine matching (and it’s not all haggis!) with wines from all over the world, yet firmly rooted in Scotland. Intrigued? Come and join us on February 6th. Slainte!

Burns in Love – Food, Fun and Fizz

Robert Burns painting by Alexander Naysmith

Why not join ‘Tasting Scotland’ and ‘Cork & Bottle’ in killing two birds with one stone? Having planned our next Food, Fun & Fizz night to take place on 6th February 2013, it makes sense to celebrate Burn’s night and Valentine’s day with us in one fell swoop.

Bring loved ones, friends, family or colleagues to enjoy a unique experience consisting of a perfectly executed blend of pop-up tapas dining, traditional wine tasting & some gourmet ‘look what’s on your doorstep’ education!

Your evening starts with a glass of fizz and nibbles, followed by a 7-stage tasting menu that gives you a unique insight into some of Tasting Scotland’s favourite local artisan food producers.

The accompanying wines from around the world all have a unique Scottish connection which will be shared with you during the ‘Cork & Bottle’ wine matching masterclass.

 

 

Where?           The Tasting Room at The Good Spirits Co.  23 Bath St, Glasgow

When?             Wednesday 6th February  2013

Time?               19:00

Cost?                £35

To book?          email pieter@corkandbottle.co.uk  or call  07939 272532

 

Tasting Menu

7 Scottish Artisan Food Producers in 7 stages

‘Some hae (smoked) meat’

The Rigs O’ Barley

 Bard’s Broth

The Great Chieftain o’ the puddin’ race

The Poet’s Ploughman

Cupid’s Dessert Cocktail 

Luscious Lots of Chocolate Love xxx

Seasonal Cheer

There is one smell that always makes me feel it’s Christmas, the smell of mulled wine. Some people turn their noses up at the thought of heating wine and chucking in some spices. It completely ruins the wine, they argue. I don’t agree, Christmas wouldn’t be quite the same without a pan of wine mulling on the stove, permeating the whole house with its seasonal aroma of wine and sweet spices.

© Maxim Shebeko | Dreamstime.com

A good mulled wine should start with a decent wine. Don’t go overboard, but something fruity, unoaked and easy drinking should do the job nicely. According to Mrs Beeton and her ‘Book of Household Management’ Claret and Port are the preferred options but then it was 1961. With a sweeter wine like Port you don’t need to add as much sugar to the mix was the argument. Pour the wine into a pan and add sugar, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. You can buy ready-mixed mulled wine spice too if you like, they come packed in teabags so that makes it nice and easy, however using the individual spices allows you to come up with your own favourite mix. I also add sliced oranges to add a bit of freshness. You can stick the cloves into the orange peel so they don’t end up in people’s glasses.

Put the sugar, spices and the juice of one fresh orange in a pan and just cover with red wine. Let this come to the boil so the sugar dissolves and reduce it down for five minutes on a high heat. Put the rest of the wine in and just let it simmer away on a very low heat. It’s great if you’re having a Christmas party as your guests won’t be able to resist the gorgeous, spicy aroma.

My final, and perhaps most important, ingredient is a good glug of brandy. Cognac or Armagnac are good, but a dark or spiced rum would work equally well. Put this in at the end so the heat of the alcohol is still there and provides not only a kick, but a drink that would warm up the coldest and darkest of nights. Merry Christmas!

Ingredients:

2 bottles of red wine

150 grams of caster sugar

2 cinnamon sticks

10 cloves

nutmeg to taste, freshly grated is best and I go for quite a lot, 10-15 goes on the grater

1 or 2 whole oranges cut in thick slices, plus juice of one orange.

2 shots of Brandy (optional)

if you like you can add vanilla pods, bay leaves and star anise to the mix too

 

Indiana Jones and the Quest for an Extreme Beverage

Earlier this week I did a brief talk on the history of wine at the Christmas dinner for the Scottish Women in Business. Here is the story I shared. Details of the Greek and Turkish wines we tasted can be found at the bottom of the article.

On a recent trip to Turkey I went in search of the “Source of Wine”. Turkey was playing host to the annual digital wine communications conference (EWBC) and one session in particular gave a unique insight in the journey wine has taken from its first wild roots.

The Roman Empire

Most people’s association with history and wine is likely to be related to the spread of the Roman Empire. And it would be true to say this is a crucial time for the modern, cultivated or domesticated vine. There is plenty of evidence showing the spread of the wine regions with Rome as its starting point. One of the most important natural historians of his time was Pliny the Elder, who became famous for his encyclopaedic work ‘Naturalis Historia’, which included a large section devoted to vines and wines. He was possibly even more famous for the manner of his death in the aftermath of the eruption of Vesuvius in AD79 and gave his name to what we describe today as a “Plinean eruption”.

The Ancient Greeks

Yet this is not where wine was born. You would have to go quite a bit further back. The Ancient Greeks used wine in ancient ceremonies, often drunk as a grog, mixed with spices, honey and water in some cases seawater. The wine “Retsina” to this day is flavoured with pine resin. The Greeks even had a God of wine, Dionysus, whom the Romans later adopted as Bacchus. The wines from ancient Greece were highly praised by its poets but some of the adulteration of it would suggest they perhaps weren’t so great after all.

Clearly modern winemaking owes more to the Romans, but we honour the Ancient Greeks by tasting a modern Greek wine which comes from Drama in the north of mainland Greece bordered by Bulgaria and Turkey. Assyrtiko is regarded as one of Greece’s best indigenous white grape varieties. We’re giving a nod to modern wine with the addition of Sauvignon Blanc. Assyrtiko originated on the island of Santorini and thrives in volcanic soils. It’s ability to withstand high summer temperatures and still retain freshness and is the secret of its success. The grape variety produces a very dry, mineral wine with almost earthy qualities, particularly when grown on the volcanic soils of Santorini. Elsewhere, such as here in Drama it produces a somewhat milder, fruitier style of wine.

So far we’ve traced wine’s first steps back from the Roman Empire down to the Ancient Greeks. But we haven’t even covered half of it. Following the traces from Greece we move 2000 years further down the line to Ancient Egypt. The Pharaohs were great imbibers of wine and even kept detailed records of what they drunk which included many vintage dated, single vineyard wines.

Anatolia

But it doesn’t stop there either. From Egypt our journey moves North-East and into Mesopotamia and ultimately ends up in current day Eastern Turkey, or Anatolia to be more precise, and countries like Georgia and Armenia. It is now believed the earliest known wines originated here. The archeological evidence was found not far from Mount Arrarat, where Noah is said to have landed his ark and planted the first vineyard.

Some of the evidence discovered in 1957 was of a tomb in Gordion, the capital of Phrygia in what is modern day Turkey. Dated to roughly 700-750BC it was named the Midas Tumulus. The hermetically sealed tomb was covered in earth. It proved a spectacular tomb belonging to what some believe is the king of Phrygia, King Midas.

Ancient Ales, Wines and Extreme Beverages

Inside the archaeologists uncovered the remains of a 60-65 year old male, as well as the largest iron age drinking set ever discovered. It consisted of 160 bronze vessels. More recent chemical research by chemist and archaeologist Patrick McGovern, who in the popular vernacular is known as the “Indiana Jones of Ancient Ales, Wines, and Extreme Beverages”, revealed not only the remains of what turned out to be some funerary feast of barbecued lamb and goat’s meat with lentils, but provided some detailed insight in what was drunk too.

Patrick McGovern: The Indiana Jones of Ancient Ales, Wines and Extreme Beverages.
Image credit: Patrick E. McGovern

The identification of tartaric acid points to grapes or grape product. Now this could have just been grape juice, however the juice would more than likely have fermented naturally considering the high ambient temperature and the fact that yeast is naturally present on the grape skins. Beeswax was also found which points towards something along the lines of honey mead. Finally beerstone (Calcium Oxalate) was discovered, a substance which is commonly associated with the production of Barley beer.

These findings led to a bit of experimental archaeology with the help of the Kavaklidere winery. They recreated the drink albeit not in a commercial sense. It was later produced in the US as the “Midas Touch Golden Elixir” and is made using Barley, honey and muscat grapes. Saffron was added as a bitter agent and would have given it a lush golden colour. A drink fit for a King.

Modern Day Turkey

Unadulterated by barley, honey or saffron our second wine comes from Turkey and is made by the same winery, Kavaklidere. Here the indigenous variety Kalecik Karasi is blended with Syrah to make a wine not unlike a French Cotes-du-Rhone. The Kalecik Karasi is named after the Kalecik district close to Ankara although it is now fairly widely grown in Turkey. It can produce a variety of wine styles, from soft, easy drinking to more complex. In character it sits somewhere between Gamay, Dolcetto and Pinot Noir.

Grape Domestication

Much earlier evidence of grape cultivation and winemaking were found in this same area and genetic research, conducted by the Swiss grape geneticist Jose Vouillamoz (one of the authors of the most authoritative book on grapes to date, Wine Grapes), has helped pin down some of the earliest evidence of grape domestication, which is now accepted as having been instrumental in the spread of the beverage. Grape domestication favoured the self-pollinating plant, where in the wild the vast majority of vines would be either male or female, with only the female bearing fruit. The hermaphroditic vine dispensed with this need and made grape growing much more efficient and with fruit readily available the drink was only a short fermentation away.

So can we trace this all the way back to the earliest glass of wine. Unlikely, according to Jose Vouillamoz, as that was probably a simple case of “serendipitous inebriation”.

Two more modern wines.

Wines

We tasted two wines on the night which were kindly supplied by Direct Wines (Laithwaites), the first of the mainstream retailers to add a Turkish wine to their range. They promised me there are more to come very soon!

Greece: Thema Assyrtiko/Sauvignon Blanc – Ktima Pavlidis – Drama 2011 (£11.49)

Turkey: Vinart Kalecik Karasi/Syrah – Kavaklidere – Aegean 2010 (£10.99)

 

 

Food, Fun and Fizz – a stage for artisan producers

Firstly congratulations to all who managed to get themselves a ticket for our sold-out inaugural Tasting Scotland ‘Food, Fun & Fizz’ event in conjunction with Cork and Bottle on Thursday 22nd November in Glasgow. Sorry to everyone else who had their sights set on the best value ticket in town, but who we couldn’t quite squeeze into the Tasting Room at The Good Spirits Co.

We described the event as being the first of what is sure to be a fabulously different wine & dine event. Friends, family or colleagues came together and enjoyed a perfectly executed blend of pop-up tapas restaurant, traditional wine tasting & some gourmet ‘look what’s on your doorstep’ education. We are delighted that the feedback has been resoundingly positive.

We can’t wait to release tickets for the next event! Join us and be amazed at how we can merge a celebration of Burn’s night with Valentine’s Day, on Wednesday 30th January.

We promised a run down on the suppliers from Thursday night’s event so here is the complete list.

The websites provide details on where to buy the products we tasted and others in their range. We hope you will give consideration to these producers when shopping or designing a menu for a special occasion. Farmers markets often give the most direct access to the producer.

 

Fizz: Syn Cuvée Blanc – McLaren Vale, Australia

The Smoked Salmon Taste Trail

Hot and cold cured salmon canapés

Artisan food producer: Rob Gower, Dunkeld Smoked Salmon*

Products tasted: Farmed Smoked Salmon, Gravadlax, Hot Smoked Salmon

www.dunkeldsmokedsalmon.com

 

Artisan food producer: The Scottish Handmade Oatcake Co.,

Products tasted: Perthshire Oatcakes Traditional (Cocktail)

www.perthshireoatcakes.co.uk

Wines

Domäne Wachau Grüner Veltliner Federspiel – Austria

Raats Unoaked Chenin Blanc, Stellenbosch, South Africa

 

The Taste Test

Artisan food producer: Mark Bush, Summer Harvest**, Madderty, Perth

Products tasted: Cold Pressed Rapeseed Oil, Raspberry / Apple & Walnut / Bramble & Juniper Dressings.

www.summerharvestoils.co.uk

 

Artisan food producer: Tapa Bakehouse, Glasgow

Products tasted: Organic sourdough bread

www.tapabakehouse.com

 

The Rare & Native ‘Irn Bru’ Pig

Pork Rillette

Artisan food producer: Arlene & Thomson McKenzie, Nethergate Larder*, Stewarton

Products tasted: Tamworth Pork Belly

Their butcher shop No 1 Avenue Larder, Stewarton, Ayrshire.

Wines

Luis Cañas Barrel Fermented Rioja Blanco, Spain

Luis Cañas Rioja – 5 months barrel maturation, Spain

 

The Smoky Soup of Scotland

Cullen Skink

Artisan food producer: Sourced by Stuart Taylor, Pisces Fishmongers & Poulterers*, Rutherglen, South Lanarkshire

Products tasted: ‘Haddies’ (Smoked Haddock)

Their fish shop 193 Main Street, Rutherglen

Wine

Bodegas Argüeso San Leon Manzanilla, Spain

 

The Game Stew is on!

Venison, Chestnut, Bramble & Juniper Stew

Artisan food producer: Mark Gibson, Edenmill Farm*, Blanefield, Glasgow

Products tasted: Venison Shoulder

www.edenmill.co.uk

Wine

Mathilde – Cotes du Rhone, France

 

Little Miss Muffet’s Dairy Box

Cheese platter

Artisan food producer: Ann Dorward, Dunlop Dairy*, Stewarton

Products tasted: Dunlop (Hard Cow’s Cheese), Bonnet (Hard Goat’s cheese)

www.dunlopdairy.co.uk

Wine

Andrew Quady Starboard Batch 88, California

 

A wee bit of fudge

Artisan food producer: Joyce Brady, The Wee Fudge Company*, Glasgow

Products tasted: White Chocolate & Sicilian Lemon oil, Belgian milk chocolate & Valencian orange oil, Belgian milk chocolate, stem ginger and mixed spice

www.weefudge.co.uk

Wine

Familia Zuccardi Tardía Torrontes, Argentina

 

Vegetarian Dishes

Artisan food producer: Eileen Wilkinson, Petrie Fine Foods, Fenwick, Ayrshire.

Products tasted Vegetable Haggis, Mediterranean Vegetable Loaf

www.ayrshirefoodnetwork.co.uk

 

Wines were supplied by the Cross Stobs Bottle Shop* with exception of the Manzanilla, which came from the Good Spirits Co*.

We’d like to thank the producers and suppliers who part sponsored* or fully sponsored** their relevant inclusion in ‘Food, Fun & Fizz’ – The Inaugural One.

We look forward to seeing you at the next one at the same place on Wednesday 30th January 2013.

Brenda & Pieter.